West flirting with nuclear war Putin




The Russian president said the escalatory rhetoric of US and EU officials betrays their lack of understanding of what is at stake

Western officials indulging in escalatory rhetoric should realize that they are effectively invoking the specter of an all-out nuclear war, Russian President Vladimir Putin warned in a speech to legislators in Moscow on Thursday. He also once again accused the West of instigating the Ukraine conflict.

Putin addressed the topic in the opening minutes of his annual state-of-the-nation speech, a key event in which the president declares his plans and priorities in a televised address to both houses of the Federal Assembly of Russia, the national legislature.

President Putin insisted that recent claims by Western officials that Moscow is planning to attack NATO are "nonsense." At the same time, those same nations are "selecting targets to conduct strikes on our territory," the Russian head of state claimed, adding that there is now talk of "deploying NATO military contingents to Ukraine."

Putin reminded would-be aggressors that all previous attempts to conquer Russia have ended in failure, warning that "now the consequences for potential invaders would be far more tragic." He pointed out that Russia has a massive nuclear arsenal, which is in a state of "complete readiness for guaranteed deployment."

The Russian president suggested that Western politicians making those escalatory remarks "have already forgotten what war is."

Unlike Russians, who have faced "difficult trials" in recent decades, Westerners apparently "think that these are just some cartoons," President Putin opined.

The Russian president’s remarks came after his French counterpart, Emmanuel Macron, toyed with the idea of a potential ground deployment of Western militaries to Ukraine while talking to reporters on Monday, saying "in terms of dynamics, we cannot exclude anything."

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg hastened to emphasize that "there are no plans for NATO combat troops on the ground in Ukraine."

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, in turn, declared that there will be "no ground troops, no soldiers on Ukrainian soil, who are sent there by European or NATO countries" in the future.

The leaders of Poland, the Czech Republic, Sweden and Finland also chimed in with similar assurances.

Commenting on Macron’s remark, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov warned that such a development would mean that "we have to talk not about the probability, but rather the inevitability" of an all-out military confrontation between NATO and Russia.

(RT.com)